Tag Archives: ear flaps

Crochet Earflap Hats for 6lb-7lb babies

Free Crochet Pattern for Newborn Sized Hat in Double Crochet.

Updated November 2, 2014  Newborn babies have a head size of 12 1/2″ to 14″ and sometimes it can be hard to find hat patterns small enough for our brand new little tiny humans.

To make a newborn hat –like a hospital sized hat- you should be alright to plan on it being 12.5″ circumference because it is going to stretch another 1 to 1.5″ until baby outgrows it at 10 days old ;)

If you are crocheting and making a top down hat in the round this just means you will continue to make increases until your circle measures 4″ (10cm) in diameter which will give you a circumference of 12.5″.   Most likely if you are reading this you are new to crochet and that part just looked a little confusing….it’s not.  It’s so easy.  Just follow me below and you will see for yourself.

You are going to need

-some heavy worsted weight/aran yarn.  Like Red Heart With Love  or Caron One Pound.  I am demonstrating below with Crafter’s Secret from Hobby Lobby.

– a size I crochet hook (5.5 mm)

– a ruler or tape measure

– stitch marker or a piece of scrap yarn to make a row marker

Gauge- We aren’t going to worry about gauge right now, we are going to focus on getting the width around that we need and I will show you how.

Ready?

Here’s the Pattern with Photos so I guess it’s kind of a tutorial.

Round 1)  Make a magic circle (or chain 2 and in the first ch) Make 12 DC in the loop.  Do not join.  PM (place marker) on the last stitch you made. Pull tail snug but not to tight yet, you need to be able to clearly see all of your stitches but they need to be close enough that you can easily move to round 2.

Round One crochet hat
End of round 1. You have 12 stitches

 

Round 2)  Make 2 double crochets in each stitch around.  You can now pull that tail enough that it closes the hole in the top of your hat.  Remember to mark your last stitch so you will know when to stop your next round.  (24 DC)

Round two of hat crochet pattern
End of round 2. You have 24 stitches

Round 3) Make  * 1 double crochet in the next stitch, make 2 double crochets in the next stitch.*     Now you will repeat that all the way around.  You will repeat exactly what is between the *’s  and when you make your last stitch PM. (36 DC)

Now get your ruler and measure right across the center of your circle.  If it measures 4″ you are ready to move on.
If it isn’t large enough then you will need a larger hook.  If it’s too big you need to start over with a smaller hook. (When I started crocheting my stitches were so tight I had to use a K–6.5 mm hook to get this size.)

End of round 3- you have 36 stitches.  Measure across.  For a newborn hat you need a 4" circle
End of round 3- you have 36 stitches. Measure across. For a newborn hat you need a 4″ circle

Since your circle is the circumference we need you will not quit making increases.  You will be making a double crochet in each stitch around the hat for another 4 rounds.  You will still need to move your marker and mark the last stitch of each round so that you know where to stop and fasten off.

Rounds 4, 5, 6, 7) Double crochet in each stitch around.  Move marker as you finish each round.   At the end of round 7 my work is just over 4″ long.  Measure yours and make another row or rows if needed then catch up with me below.
DO NOT CUT YOUR YARN because we are going to use it to make the first ear flap.

At the end of row 7 work measures just over 4" long
At the end of row 7 work measures just over 4″ long

 

Ear Flaps Pattern

To add earflaps to your hat follow these instructions.  The ear flaps are worked in rows back and forth.

Row 1)  Dc 8 stitches beyond your maker, Ch 3 and turn (8 dc)

Row 2)  Dc  in the next st and each  of the nxt 6 across  Turn (7 dc + ch3 = 8 dc)

Row 3)  Do not chain. Starting with the nxt st, DC each across (7 DC)  Turn

Row 4)   Do not chain. Starting with the nxt st, DC each across.  Turn  (6 DC)

Row 5) Do not chain. Starting with the nxt st, DC each across (5 DC) Turn

Row 6) Do not chain. Starting with the nxt st, DC each across (4 DC) Turn

Row 7) Do not chain. Starting with the nxt st, DC each across (3 DC)

Row 8) Do not chain. Starting with the nxt st, DC each across (2 DC) Cut yarn, leaving a long tail for weaving in and fasten.

The first earflap has been added to the hat
The first earflap has been added to the hat

 

Now flip your hat over so you have the top of the hat nearest you and the earflap you just made on the righthand side.  Like the picture below.

Turn hat upside down and count stitches across the front to add second earflap
Turn hat upside down and count stitches across the front to add second earflap

Now count 12 stitches to the left of where your existing earflap starts.  Join your yarn in the stitch to the left of the 13th.

Row 1)  ch 3, and DC in the same stitch.  DC in the next 7 st across.

Now follow rows 2-8 of the earflap directions.

When you are done with the 2nd earflap don’t cut the yarn just yet.  Fold the hat in half, line up the earflaps and double check to make sure you go them the same length.  When you are good to go fasten off, cut yarn and weave in your ends.

Your hat has earflaps now!  Now we just need to add a border.
Your hat has earflaps now! Now we just need to add a border.

You now have a newborn sized snow boarders hat with earflaps!

 

Below are links to patterns for basic newborn sized hats in single and double crochet

 

Terms of Use for this pattern: You are free to use finished garments from this pattern as you choose including selling them.
If you give any credit to the website (www.allyssite.com) it would be greatly appreciated but not required.
If you feature this pattern on the internet or any physical publication, do not include the wording or text of the pattern, instead provide a link to our website.

ABBREVIATIONS

  • ch= chain
  • sc= single crochet
  • dc= double crochet
  • ss= slip stitch

©2011 www.AllysSite.com

Knitted Earflap Hat

Knitted Earflap Hat in Royal Blue & Black Stripes

Quick Knitted Earflap hat
Snowboarders hat knitted with size 8 needles

My pattern to knit an earflap hat like this is HERE

So I got myself retrained a bit with the knitting.

One thing I noticed when I was knitting Wil’s Indianapolis Colts Ear flap hat with the checkerboard pattern was that the tips of my fingers were very sore.  This is due to my terrible habit of knitting too tightly on circulars.  So….

  1. since his friend wanted a blue and black hat
  2. I needed to get my tension issues resolved
  3. I wanted to write down the details in order of the actual pattern that I had developed from several
  4. A completed hat needed to be the size I was supposed to be knitting!
  5. I wanted an idea of how much yarn it really took (ie if I buy more expensive yarn how many hats will I get from a skein)
  6. there was a need to double check myself on crafting jog-less stripes
  7. the idea I learned from the Knitting Tips by Judy about slipping the first stitch (when doing ear flaps) gave a cleaner edge and I wanted to try it
  8. I had finally figured out cable cast on (thanks to KnittingTips.com) and wanted to try it out when I added the stitches across the front of the hat
  9. probably many more but I’m typing this up a month after the facts….

 

It seemed like the perfect opportunity. I cast on and made it a point that every stitch was going to slide off the needle withOUT my left finger assisting it and that I would knit straight thru without a single red spot on the ends of my finger tips.

The hat took [me] about 6 hours total and less than a softball sized amount of each the black and royal blue yarn.

Amazingly it fit Wil’s 21″ head, Vee’s 23″ head, and Stephan’s 24″

As the teens and tweens in my house very quite specific about if they were to wear any more of my hats in public

-The front was was not so high up on the forehead that it gave them the appearance of a five  year old girl with dorky bangs.  They all actually approved of the front.

-The back was long enough that it covered the back of their neck

-The boys liked that it was the full 8″ length because it gave that ‘floppy look’ as they called it.  The girls said it could have been an inch shorter and they would have been fine.

-The fashion conscious TJ (weeks before his 17th birthday) said good job on my grafting the top closed as it gave a flatter appearance although he still wants to see one in super fine yarn and size 0 or 1 needles.